AHG In A Homeschool

Do you homeschool your children, or are you considering it? American Heritage Girls can be a useful supplement to your program. In addition to regular Troop activities,  a good portion of the badgework can be done at home, forming a ready-made Unit studies program for you. Try out these articles to see how easy it can be:

http://www.autism-in-the-christian-home.com/American-Heritage-Girl.html

http://www.jaibrian.com/

http://www.homeschoollegacy.com/index.html

Our Badge Helps section of this blog and our Pinterest boards are designed to help you accomplish AHG projects in a Troop or at home. Remember also that a number of the Outings we suggest on this blog could be used for school-time field trips.

Tip: Patch Placement

Recently we’ve had several inquiries about where to put activity patches — especially Operation Christmas Child — on the uniform vest or sash.

The Girl Handbook simply states “Activity patches should be placed on the back of the sash or vest. Examples of activity patches include events, AHG Pen Pal Program, HUGS patch and rockers.”

So helpful, isn’t it? What it is really saying is that there is such a variety of patches a girl can earn, it’s impossible to prescribe just where they should go. However, we do have a couple of tips to offer:

  • Working generally from top to bottom seems to make sense for a lot of girls. It does tend to make the patches more visible at eye-level, especially for the smaller girls.
  • Girls with long hair may prefer to work from bottom to top, so their patches aren’t covered by their hair.
  • Remember to allow room for rocker patches (year bars) if it’s a patch that can be earned annually.

And as far as attaching them — some people love Badge Magic, some prefer stitching them down. Think ahead if you’ll want to preserve the vest/sash entire and the end of the Level, or if you’ll want to remove them to create a larger display.

What other tips have you picked up?

Badge Interpretation Question

Question — if you look at requirements #27 and #28 of Dawn of Our Country, they ask a girl to “visit a historical site” and “tour the home of a President”, respectively. The examples given are from the early years of our country, which is in line with the subject of the badge…. but they aren’t exactly daytrips from here. Kansas City has a good collection of historical sites, and two different homes of President Harry S. Truman, but he is from a very different era than Washington, Adams, and Jefferson. Do you require a girl to select a site/home from the colonial period — meaning a roadtrip — or do you go with the strict wording of the requirements and allow local sites/homes?

Dull Badges? No!

“There are no dull merit badges, only dull instructors.” Ouch! Some good tips here for getting kids excited about the drier subjects — what’s your favorite tip?
http://blog.scoutingmagazine.org/2012/10/29/there-are-no-dull-merit-badges-only-dull-instructors/

Climb On!

Climb On! Have your girls expressed an interest in learning rock climbing? Kansas City has several options for supervised activities. Consider the Ibex Climbing Gym in Blue Springs, Emerald City Gym in Overland Park, or Ironwoods Park Challenge Course in Leawood. Remember this is a High Adventure activity, so make sure you have your safety plan in place.